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FAA Will Lift US Grounding of Boeing 737 MAX on Wednesday

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Sources tell KING 5 that the Federal Aviation Administration will lift the 20-month grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX in the United States on Wednesday. (www-king5-com.cdn.ampproject.org) עוד...

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ADXbear
ADXbear 18
God bless that airplane and Boeings employees. We need a big boost to aviation, hoping for a stellar 2021 on all fronts..
emkostiuk
emkostiuk 7
djjamar
Jamar Jackson 4
Just like the B58 Hustler scared the pilots crashed twice in paris airshows, the MAX scared the public world wide perception is ruined. Bad gamble by Boeing that will cost them Billions. Sad the FAA global reputation and trust was also ruined.
darjr26
darjr26 3
I’ve never understood why Boeing didn’t design a 757-Max. Performance wise the 757 is a much better aircraft and they wouldn’t have had the ground clearance problems the 737 has.
JMARTINSON
JMARTINSON 1
could it be because Southwest likes ground clearance problems?
wecsam
David Tsai 1
Probably has something to do with the supply chain and type ratings.
Bobh528FA
Bob Hallissy 3
three video clips on this page play at the same time -- turn your sound off until you can find all the pause buttons!
WhiteKnight77
WhiteKnight77 1
I sent them an email about that from their contact us page. That is really unacceptable.
georgewilhelmsen
George Wilhelmsen 4
It's about time.

Consider this:
2 US air crews had this malfunction. No loss of life. Both planes flew safely.
2 foreign carrier air crews had this event, and crashed.

Do you see a link here? It comes down to inadequate training by foreign carriers.

But Boeing has big pockets, and takes the blame. And the plane gets a black eye.

Could the design have been better? Sure.

But the fact remains that all the air crews had to do is open the circuit breakers on the right lower section of the throttle pedestal, and everybody lives.

I'd fly a Boeing product any day of the week. If you fly an Airbus plane, listen as the plane lands. It sounds like it's falling apart. You don't get that from any Boeing plane.
bobinson66
bobinson66 5
I think there's more to it than poorly trained pilots. The two planes that crashed were sold with a minimum of upgrades. For whatever reason, Boeing let those planes out of the factory with minimal redundant systems that fed data to the MCAS. Couple a bad AOA sensor with undertrained pilots who never knew there was an MCAS system and we see the results.

American carriers purchased fully upgraded equipment with several redundant systems feeding data to the MCAS leading to far fewer MCAS problems. American carriers pilots with many more hours of training and experience were also able to overcome MCAS deficiencies when problems arose. Still, Boeing not telling pilots about the MCAS is, at best, questionable. At worst, criminal.
JMARTINSON
JMARTINSON 1
I think there's more to it than poorly trained pilots... Like Lion Air's problems with procedures, documentation, and maintenance, you mean?

The two planes that crashed were sold with a minimum of upgrades... They were also bought that way.


For whatever reason, Boeing let those planes out of the factory with minimal redundant systems that fed data to the MCAS.... They reason is they were designed that way.


Couple a bad AOA sensor with undertrained pilots who never knew there was an MCAS system and we see the results... How in the world did the pilots in the second crash not know about MCAS? By then everybody knew what MCAS was.

American carriers purchased fully upgraded equipment... Some did, some didn't. Some like Southwest did, but didn't have due to a software glitch.

with several redundant systems feeding data to the MCAS leading to far fewer MCAS problems... Wrong, they all had the same level of redundancy.

American carriers pilots with many more hours of training and experience were also able to overcome MCAS deficiencies when problems arose... what problems? As in airline and flight number, please.


Still, Boeing not telling pilots about the MCAS is, at best, questionable. At worst, criminal... What if, say, Boeing did tell pilots about MCAS but you say they didn't? What's that at best and worst? System differences manual page 748 if I remember right.f
runway2810
Roger Neuhaus 2
ah, so, the FAA grounded an airplane for quite 2 years (20 months) because of inadequate training of foreign carriers??? Interesting your argument. Give a break and come up with more reasonable thinking and conclusions. Your writing shows little respect for the 386 deaths and for countries that are not able to be "Big America" and have not the means.
I will not comment your stupid last sentence, which lacks any logic
sprint113
sprint113 2
The poor training arguably also falls on Boeing. The Max is attractive because it required minimal training for existing 737 pilots. So either they nix the minimal training "feature" of the plane, or they re-engineer/re-design aspects of the plane so that pilots can still receive minimal training and safely operate the plane, or a little of both.
JMARTINSON
JMARTINSON 1
The airlines thank you for the free pass.

Boeing doesn't have any authority in, say, Indonesia. They can only advise.
SteveCutchen
Steve Cutchen 2
"Do you see a link here?"

I see an anecdote.
Maybe a basis for a hypothesis.
I certainly do not see science.
SteveCutchen
Steve Cutchen 2
I also see outcome bias, and I see hindsight bias.
jathacker101
John Thacker 1
Well stated. The media in this world has gone over the edge. THANKS for you insight and position!
frankzackary
Frank Zackary 2
I find it odd that no Airbus aircraft were grounded after MULTIBLE fatal aircraft computer generated crashes.
augerin
Dave Mathes 2
...and the Zen master said "we'll see"...
pilotjag
pilotjag 2
Boeing Press Release...
https://boeing.mediaroom.com/2020-11-18-Boeing-Responds-to-FAA-Approval-to-Resume-737-MAX-Operations
RetiredCaptain
Jasper Buck 2
Wednesday 18 November 2020

RESCISSION OF EMERGENCY ORDER OF PROHIBITION

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Emergency Order of Prohibition issued March 13, 2019, applicable to Boeing Company Model 737-8 and Boeing Company Model 737-9 airplanes, is rescinded with effect as described below. This rescission enables operation of Boeing Company Model 737-8 and Boeing Company Model 737-9 airplanes only upon satisfaction of applicable requirements for return to service. The FAA is superseding Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2018-23-51, which applied to all The Boeing Company Model 737-8 and 737-9 (737 MAX) airplanes.

Please see the following FAA documents for a comprehensive discussion of the foregoing;

https://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=93206

https://www.faa.gov/foia/electronic_reading_room/boeing_reading_room/media/737_AD_2019-NM-035fr.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/foia/electronic_reading_room/boeing_reading_room/media/737_MAX_Rescission_of_Grounding_Order.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Notice/N_8900.570_FAAWeb.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Notice/N_8900.569_FAA_Web.pdf

Best Regards

Capt J Buck

ATP DC-9 B757 B767
Flight Instructor
Ground Instructor
Aircraft Dispatcher
A&P Mechanic
Air Traffic Controller
FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (Ret.)
FAA certified accident investigator (Ret.)
ICAO Panel Member
Aviation Safety Consultant
jjzee07
Juan Zermeno 2
Imagine Ford, GM or any automotive manufacturer kept their 1967 car line up and just added better brakes, better engine, seats, but left the original body style and they tried to sell it to the public. I know the cost between creating a new car and plane is huge but see my point?
JMARTINSON
JMARTINSON 1
No, not really.
JoelRugeno
Joel Rugeno 2
Sad that Boeing’s good name has been tarnished so badly and the CEO who committed the deed has been rewarded with a nice financial package into retirement. The FAA, too, has lost the stellar reputation they once enjoyed. The Max is now a safe airplane to fly but I intend to never be in it
stroboli62
Leo Larkin 1
Makin the B737 100-300 series look like gem all the time
kc4wvl
William Smith 1
Seems everyone firgets about all the problems and deaths regarding the DC-10. Was it grounded worldwide? Nope. Even though far more people died. Every aircraft is a compromise. There is no guarantee that issues won't show up with a new or modified design. You want a guarantee? Buy a toaster, and even then you're not guaranteed perfect safety.
darjr26
darjr26 2
The DC-10 was grounded in the USA and in most other countries, I think around 1979. It didn’t help much because it had several major accidents after it was returned to service.
PeterAshby
Peter Ashby 1
Sir Laurence Olivier "is it safe?"

Canada Aviation Authority" not sure yet"
bubblecom
Robert Fleury 1
Going down to the basic: does this design carries inherent stabilty? If you need a computer to keep it in the air, the answer is NO. Let's not try to make a cat bark like a dog...
tongo
Dan Grelinger 2
You're right. BAN Teslas!
JMARTINSON
JMARTINSON 1
Yes, it does "carries inherent stabilty". No you don't need a computer to keep it in the air so the answer is YES. Let's not try to piss on everyone's boots and say it's raining.
bentwing60
bentwing60 -2
Well over played hand by the guys who 'certified' it.

[This comment has been downvoted. Show anyway.]

KicksOnRoute66
Roger Anderson 11
More room for me!
tongo
Dan Grelinger 3
Do you ride in a car? Hmmmm.
augerin
Dave Mathes 1
...well good for you!...

[This comment has been downvoted. Show anyway.]

augerin
Dave Mathes 1
....uhhh, what's your problem, Bevis...
andyc852
Andy Cruickshank -2
You sir are the ass
augerin
Dave Mathes 0
...well, maybe they could call it the ' seven thirty seven eleventy ten'... You know, those imaginary numbers...
E1craZ4life
Edward Bardes 0
Which will last longer?
The grounding of the 737 MAX, or the COVID19 pandemic?
JMARTINSON
JMARTINSON 1
How much money do you have?

E1craZ4life
Edward Bardes 2
No idea what that's supposed to mean.
ElliotCannon
Elliot Cannon -1
Compare the original 737 with the 737 Max. No comparison but differences training is a lot cheaper than having to acquire a whole new type rating. It's all about the $$$.
RWSlater
Ron Slater -4
So it's renamed the 737-9 ?
chabig
Chris Habig 2
No. There are four models of different sizes in the 737 MAX series. 737 MAX 7, 737 MAX 8, 737 MAX 9, and 737 MAX 10.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_737
RetiredCaptain
Jasper Buck 2
Actually there is no MAX 7 or MAX 10. The official FAA approved Boeing models are:

737-100, 737-200, 737-200C, 737-300, 737-400, 737-500, 737-600, 737-700, 737-700C, 737-800, 737-900, 737-900ER, 737-8, 737-9, C-40A, T-43A.

Those are the models that are on FAA Type Certificate Data Sheet A16WE which can be found here:

ttps://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgMakeModel.nsf/0/1c2b973615d72f9c8625861c00508676/$FILE/A16WE_Rev66.pdf

The Boeing 737-8 and 737-9 are the two airplanes that have the GE LEAP engine and are considered to be the MAX versions of the 737 line. The term "MAX" is a marketing term used by Boeing and not an *official* FAA designation. The -7 and -10 "MAX" airplanes were on the drawing board but have not yet been approved by the FAA.

As an aside all the pilots who get type rated on the 737 get the type rating on their certificate that says B737.

Best

J Buck
FAA (ret.)
ATP DC-9 (DC-9-11 thru B-717)

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