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Jack Roush injured in WI plane crash

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Jack Roush was injured in a landing crash at Oshkosh (www.thatsracin.com) עוד...

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c525irs
Ryan Sybesma 0
http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/general_aviation/read.main/4879556/
CaseyGa1991
Casey Strickland 0
Thanks for the link. Thoughts and prayers go out.
CaseyGa1991
Casey Strickland 0
Here's the video footage of the scene http://www.cnn.com/video/?/video/us/2010/07/28/vo.wi.oshkosh.airshow.crash.cnn
flynbrian
brian finney 0
I am glad everyone is allright, but this is his second accident. If I were Jack, I believe I might hire a professional or two to fly me around.
CanadianRedbird
CanadianRedbird 0
I too, agree that Jack should think about hiring a professional pilot to transport him wherever he goes. Glad to hear the injuries may not be too severe & he and his passenger get back into their normal life's duties.
buddy0476
Tom Lindgren 0
Facts are wrong. The crash into the Alabama pond was in an ultralight, not a P51.
toolguy105
toolguy105 0
As the saying goes: "Any landing you walk away from is a good one". Jack has walked away from two other than perfect landings; it is time to think about hiring professional pilots.

None of the news reports I've read say exactly what happened during the landing. Any one know? Did he land hard or did he skid of the runway for some reason?

Jack, get well soon, hope to see you back at the NASCAR tracks soon.
kb9uwu
Matt Comerford 0
From what I read from eye witnesses on an Oshkosh blog the day of.... He was 50-100ft off of the rwy, said he was going around, banked 45 degrees left and dropped out of the sky. Sounds like he banked and brought the nose up before the engines spooled up. There are screen shots of the plane banked left above the rwy and ATC recordings.
abowles1
Andrew bowles 0
the crash in the alabama pond WAS jacks p-51 see article

Jack Roush's private P-51 Mustang airplane crashed near a lake outside of Mongomery, AL, Friday night. Roush, the pilot, was being airlifted to University Hospital in Birmingham. His condition was unknown. More to come.(ThatsRacin.com) AND NBC6.com in Charlotte is reporting Roush is in a medically induced coma with two broken legs. AND A small experimental aircraft has crashed in Troy, AL. Reports indicate the accident occurred near a gated community sub-division in Troy between 6:00-7:00pm. Jack Roush, a prominent NASCAR team owner, was reportedly the person piloting the craft and transported to Birmingham for further care. Reports indicate that another person was involved who may have been trying to aid Roush and that person is believed to be Larry Hicks a Pike County conservation officer, a graduate of Lee High School, and a retired Marine Corps Sergeant Major. Apparently Hicks saw the aircraft crash and went in to the lake to pull Roush out. Hicks only suffered minor burns and is doing fine at home.(12WSFA.com)(4-19-2002)
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
It's been reported that Jack has over 5000 hours of flight time. This number in no way makes one a "professional pilot." The same could be said for a housewife driving her brood around town for 5000 hours makes her a professional race driver. Actually being belted in at the controls does not make one a professional anything. What you do with those hours, what you learn, your personal attitude and currency with the equipment is what makes for a professional and safe flight.
CrawfordAir
CrawfordAir 0
There has been more than one "professional" pilot to crash an airplane and many in which nobody walked away from.
Nobody has all the facts. But even if it comes down to pilot error, we all make mistakes.
Obviously an accomplished pilot having just flown his P51 for the crowd and experience in who knows how many types of aircraft that many of us can only dream about.
I hope Jack a speedy recovery and I hope he gets back into the left seat soon.
abcdefghijklmnopqrs
abcdefghijklmnopqrs 0
It was not his P-51 in the Alabama crash, it was an experimental plane, it was not his.
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
CrawfordAir: Yes, professional pilots do have accidents. That's because most commercial and airshow flying is done by professional pilots; it's called exposure. The problem comes up when wealthy part time pilots purchase airplanes that are beyond their capabilities and try to fly them like they were commuting in their Ford Mustang. Crack up two or three Ford Mustangs and the insurance company will begin to raise your driving rate for the priviledge of driving that vehicle. I wonder what Jack R. will be paying for hull and liability insurance after several expensive accidents, if he can even get insured. Having a professional pilot along for the ride is not a sign of weakness, it is simply a very good, inexpensive form of insurance. It's what I do for a living and I feel like I've earned my salary several times over. Thanks.......
toolguy105
toolguy105 0
When you do anything part-time you never really own it. Jack is a great NASCAR team owner; he does that full time, that is why he is good at it. Jack is a weekend pilot, or in his case a weekday pilot something he does for fun and relaxation. It appears the plane got ahead of him and he made a mistake. A professional, full time pilots do not let the s they fly get ahead of them. They stay a head of the plane.

Yes a professional pilot can have an accident, when they do it is generally because of Mechanical defect, weather or something beyond their control.
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
Thanks, toolguy. I believe we're reading from the same page......
toolguy105
toolguy105 0
Yes ken we are
flyer07
flyer07 0
This is from a press conference back in April 2002 after his accident in Alabama.

...” WHAT TYPE OF PLANE WAS IT? “It was not Jack’s P-51, that was speculated. It’s called an twin-engine air cam, and we do not know the details of what precipitated the accident...”
CrawfordAir
CrawfordAir 0
What am I missing here? Every time I fly, I should have a professional pilot on board?
mizatt
Matt Ukena 0
Hmmm... Start flying the aircraft like a pilot instead of driving them like a NASCAR and perhaps the safety record will improve...
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
To: CrawfordAir
In all honesty, whether you need someone with you is completely up to you. What's your level of experience and competency, when was the last time you flew, are you comfortable in your airplane, what's your mission and most important, who are you bringing along?
My background is military (tailhook fighters in Viet Nam), a full career with two legacy carriers and type ratings in most of Boeing's heavy metal. I currently fly the Eclipse and a couple of Citations for families and individuals. I'm a bit picky about who I fly with, it has a lot to do with how they treat their airplanes and employees. My first flight was 46 years ago; I've never dinged a wingtip nor blown a tire, I feel I've earned the right to be selective about who I fly for......
Having said that, you may not need a safety or professional pilot with you at all times. But like any insurance, he or she will cost you far less than the cost of replacing JR's Beechcraft.
CrawfordAir
CrawfordAir 0
Ken,
If only we asked all the questions about my experience with regard to Mr. Roush and his and in his airplane. That is what I mean when I say we don't know all the facts. We don't know his currency, time in type, or recent reviews. So, it is difficult to "know" whether or not he "should" have had a professional pilot with him. Would a pro being with him help? Probably yes. In fact even another rated pilot might have been helpful. But that is the risk, as I am sure you know, that one takes.
We don't know all the details that lead to this crash. Yes, regardless of wind and ATC instruction, it is the pilot that makes the essential decisions, we know that.
In this case, something went wrong. But I don't gravitate to a presumption that Mr, Roush should not be flying alone or any other pilot who makes a mistake.
I am proud of your accomplishment and clean record. But are you telling me you never made any mistakes?
I am not challenging your experience as an aviator at all and I am not sure why it seems my experience has anything to do with the incident at hand.
I do fly with pilots far more experienced than I and when I do I always seem to learn something. But, I also fly solo regularly and often. If I had to take that extra insurance with me all the time, I would have to stop flying. If others followed that model, general aviation would come to an end. Surely, that is not the massage we want to send to persons flying or wanting to learn to fly.
Right?
Mr. Roush walked away from this one. And yes, it seems two others. Much better than the person who crashes once and nobody walks away, pro or not.
BTW - thank you for your service.
Norm
leecrab2
leecrab2 0
I'm pretty sure Mr. Roush flies multiple times most weeks and he's had that Premier for a few years I believe. He has been widely known for years to be an aviation buff and is a regular participant at Airventure (most years I think)...and there is no telling what all types of aircraft he owns and has experience in. I would think he has reached the level of professional pilot.
One fact that I saw about the crash was a brief communication between Mr. Roush, another pilot in another aircraft, and the tower...the tower was advising the 2nd aircraft about his approach (the say a few things back and forth) and then Roush comes over the communication and asks if that is going to be ok for 6JR (his tail number...I'm sure most of you know this)...the tower responds affirmative...and Roush replies something like "I don't think so". That is all of the communication that was played on the Nascar show I was watching...interesting though.
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
Gentlemen,
Jack Roush is a good business man and probably hires a lawyer to write his contracts. I assume he goes to a trained doctor to patch up his bruises and attend to his aches. The airlines of this country retire professional pilots at age 65; Jack is now pushing 69 years of age. Perhaps he is slowing down a bit and it's time for a safety pilot. It's not a disgrace, it's a way to save him from his 4th - and I hope not fatal - accident.
bcameron
bcameron 0
AvWeb has posted stills:http://www.avweb.com/news/airventure/EAAAirVenture2010_JackRoushCrash_MomentOfImpact_203026-1.html#gallery and yesterday posted (silence-edited) ATC 'tape'. Interesting that the only comment on the freq was "Don't think so" perhaps from one of the other pilots in the pattern in reference to a transmission fr 6JR to the effect "we'll be OK" then subsequently dropped a wing and did an about face. Pretty clear 6JR should have initiated a go-around much earlier rather than getting jammed w/ a plane in front of him and trying to maneuver at low power and speed. 18 was closed and the two other aircraft were directed to enter pattern for 09-27. The CNN vid is footage of crash crew hosing dn the wreckage & helping a bloodied Jack walk under his own power from the wreck. Had to have been in shock. Also has to be self-insuring these days - he can afford it...
beaver5197561
andrew holt 0
There is a saying that states a pilots licence and money is enough to get someone killed....... It just looks like he lost situational awareness SA and the plane was to much for him....
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
I don't care if you're dropping from under the wing of a B-52 in a hypersonic research airplane or spending Sunday flying a Cessna spam can around an uncontrolled airport. You need three things to be clear in your mind.
What are your capabilities? What (or where) are you going? What will you do if something really unexpected (i.e. BAD) happens? Needless to say, getting behind any airplane will violate at least two of these rules of life. Professionalism is mostly a mindset, no matter what business you're in.
CrawfordAir
CrawfordAir 0
Ken, I agree with you absolutely! But the mistake can be made and it does happen do pros too. In this case, it appears that there are a number of circumstances. What were they and why?
I am not saying there wasn't pilot error by any stretch. Only that given the circumstances, this seems to be an example of several events happening in a short period of time that can catch anyone of guard and why we have to be on our toes.
A "professional" in the left seat would not guarantee that the incident would not have happened. That is all I am saying.
Kjoden44
Ken Oden 0
Norm - you're absolutely right. A hired professional in the other seat would not have guaranteed a safe arrival. Two sets of eyes and hands might have improved the odds, but no guarantees.....
I've been to Oshkosh twice - and drove there both times. The amount of traffic going in and out of the field during that week is something I'd rather avoid. <g> Getting old I guess.........
Ken
CrawfordAir
CrawfordAir 0
Ken, I agree with you absolutely! But the mistake can be made and it does happen do pros too. In this case, it appears that there are a number of circumstances. What were they and why?
I am not saying there wasn't pilot error by any stretch. Only that given the circumstances, this seems to be an example of several events happening in a short period of time that can catch anyone of guard and why we have to be on our toes.
A "professional" in the left seat would not guarantee that the incident would not have happened. That is all I am saying.

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