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Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 Rejects LAX Takeoff After Hitting Object On Runway

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An Alaska Airlines flight aborted takeoff at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) after hitting a large piece of debris on the runway. The aircraft rolled to a stop safely and returned to the apron. A suspected fragment of rubber The incident occurred at LAX on Tuesday, April 11th - Alaska Airlines flight AS1263 from Los Angeles to Redmond Municipal Airport (RDM) was accelerating for takeoff when it impacted with what the crew believed was a piece of rubber on the runway. (www.msn.com) More...

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bentwing60
bentwing60 14
Kudos to the crew and with at least 9000 feet of runway left for an RTO, a no brainer.

The aircraft went to the MX barn for a thorough inspection of flaps, lower wing and horizontal stab., on a conventional tail aircraft, as those are usually the most often struck by blown main tyre detritus. And given the lack of detail, somebody must have gone somewhere minus one.
sabre45
Joe Vincent 4
Years ago a FedEx DC-10-30, which had taken off from Heathrow bound for Memphis, was informed out over the Atlantic to be aware that they only have one nose wheel. The other one had evidently come off during rotation and was found off the runway!
fireftr
Dale Ballok 3
“Detritus”, the word for the day!
ewrcap
David Beattie 1
Yes! Latin words are more impressive.

mhawke1
Michael Hawke 1
It is reported that it was part of the expansion joint from runway.
sgbelverta
sharon bias 9
Wonder if they notified the plane(s) who had just landed or taken off that they might be missing some parts?
avionik99
avionik99 7
Just another ground maintenance issue we see happening more and more lately. Something needs to be done or the errors can become far more deadly.
mhawke1
Michael Hawke 1
So what was the ground maintenance issue that us happening so often here? The rubber they hit was expansion joint from runway according to FAA
sabre45
Joe Vincent 3
In my experience, the term "abort" a takeoff is used more by the military versus civilian aviation which uses "reject."
johntaylor571
John Taylor 3
"A suspected fragment of rubber" You just can't get good help these days. Many years ago, I was at Beale AFB when my KC-135 (I was the crew chief) took off and I was listening to my handheld scanner when the tower called my jet to ask if the were having any engine problems. At first the pilot said no then came back and said that the EPR and EGT were not responding to changing throttle inputs. It turns out the number 3 engine turbine had shelled out and left parts all over the runway. A sweeper was called out but a radio call from the sweeper truck driver said they needed a FOD walk to pick up the "bigger"pieces. I still have a a couple of the turbine blades and an EGT probe. The only real airframe damage was a good size hole in the right inboard flap. Some speed tape and we were go to go until we back to home station. It's amazing that the aircrew never noticed anything until called. They shut the engine down and returned to base. We obviously had to do an engine change before we could return to home station but the speed tape on the flap up fine.
pilot62
Scott Campbell 2
What is the fix ? Automatic FOD system
jimjallen
Jim Allen 2
How exactly does that work? Seriously? I can envision a low level scan but how do you keep small animals and such from getting detected.
mimana
mimana 1
Runaway inspections must be done more frequently. Well-trained and sound crew.
fireftr
Dale Ballok 0
Never heard of a takeoff being “rejected”! Is that a new aeronautical term? It’s always been, “aborted”.
KA2GEH
KA2GEH 7
Umm, no, a “rejected takeoff” is often used when such a takeoff is aborted. Fairly common usage.

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ewrcap
David Beattie 2
Once again proving the old saying, profanity is the linguistic crutch of the ignorant.

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